Now Hiring Veterinarians ~MPI – Ministry for Primary Industries. A New Zealand Government Department.

MPI vets make sure New Zealand’s food and animal products are of a high standard and that animal welfare is being looked after. Find out more about their work and how to join the team.


RECRUITING – REGISTER YOUR INTEREST NOW

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) is looking for veterinarians from New Zealand and overseas who:

  • are either registered or eligible for registration with the Veterinary Council of NZ
  • have great people skills
  • are passionate about maintaining our high animal welfare and food standards.

Vets ensure high standards

A vet checking a cow on a farm with a stethoscope with help from a farmer
MPI vets check animals for health and welfare

MPI’s Verification Services makes sure New Zealand’s animal products meet New Zealand standards and the standards of the countries we’re exporting to. Our vets play a key role, working on the front line to ensure the welfare of animals, and that our food and animal products are safe and suitable.

As an MPI vet, you’ll talk to a range of people in your day-to-day work – so you’ll need to be able to translate your technical knowledge into everyday language and relate well with others.

Many career paths for MPI vets

MPI vets work in both rural and urban areas throughout New Zealand where meat, seafood and other animal products are processed and stored. As an MPI vet you might:

  • work with providers on-farm to ensure animal welfare is maintained
  • audit cold store, deer, fish, and chicken farm processing – meeting with facility managers, making sure animal welfare is protected, verifying their processes, and providing export certification
  • work on-site at processing facilities – conducting ante-mortem and post-mortem inspections, monitoring animal welfare compliance, reviewing post-mortem processes, certifying products for export, and working with on-site managers to ensure safe and efficient processes.

Our vets also:

  • certify food and animal products for export
  • verify and certify processing facilities for meat, seafood, game, and dairy
  • certify imported animal products at airports or seaports
  • monitor containment facilities of animals (like zoos) to ensure that they are free of biosecurity risk.

Other roles suitable for MPI vets include market access, policy, or biosecurity career pathways – all of which are open to you.

Want to become an MPI vet?

You’ll need:

  • a veterinary qualification that is eligible for registration with the Veterinary Council of New Zealand
  • a commitment to ensuring animal welfare requirements are met
  • computer literacy and familiarity with Microsoft software
  • a positive attitude and flexible approach to new challenges and ideas
  • good interpersonal skills
  • to value differences and respect alternative views
  • sound written and verbal communication skills
  • the ability to work and make decisions independently
  • a commitment to team work.

Register your interest

Sheep in a paddock
MPI vets work in both rural and urban New Zealand.

If you think you have the skills we’re looking for, you can register your interest and we’ll keep you up-to-date on the latest opportunities.

Full training after you start

If you become an MPI vet, you’ll get formal training to help you do your job. You’ll spend 6 to 8 weeks in full-time technical training before you are warranted as an MPI vet.

Once you start work as an MPI vet you’ll also get:

  • ongoing, on-site practical training, mentoring and technical support
  • a comprehensive in-service training programme to develop your technical and management skills (including interpersonal and communication skills).

THINKING ABOUT MOVING TO NEW ZEALAND?

Not sure whether to make the move to New Zealand? Find out what it’s like, where to find support, and what your employment rights are.

Who to contact

If you have questions about becoming a vet, email rst@mpi.govt.nz

Source: Veterinarians | MPI – Ministry for Primary Industries. A New Zealand Government Department.

Australian and New Zealand Laboratory Animal Association – Welfare Conference

Animal Welfare Symposium
The 2017 symposium will be held on Wednesday 24th May 2017 at the University of Western Australia,
For further information, please click here.
For details about registration, please contact Tecniplast
The Animal Welfare Workshop has had a strong response and is completely full. 

Source: Australian and New Zealand Laboratory Animal Association – CONFERENCES

4th OIE Global Conference on Animal Welfare 6-8 December 2016 Mexico

Animal welfare was first identified as a priority in the OIE’s Third Strategic Plan 2001-2005. OIE Member Countries mandated the organisation to take the lead internationally on animal welfare and, as the international reference organisation for animal health, to elaborate standards and guidelines covering animal welfare practices, reaffirming that animal health is a key component of animal welfare.

From this perspective, the OIE is committed to improve the welfare of animals globally and to enhance the positive relationship between humans and animals.

To date, sixteen animal welfare chapters have been adopted by OIE Member Countries. However, implementation of the standards varies around the world. Experience tells us that to implement OIE standards within diverse cultural, economic and religious contexts a variety of tools are needed as well as balanced relationships with committed partners both from the public and private sectors.

us contexts a variety of tools are needed as well as balanced relationships with committed partners both from the public and private sectors.

Source: 4th OIE Global Conference on Animal Welfare